Transmission surging

How much?! The CarsDirect editorial team is dedicated to providing our readers with the latest on new and used cars, expert opinions on which vehicles make the grade, and all the fun stuff in between. In most cases, getting a transmission flush every 30, miles, or every two years or so is sufficient. However, there may be times when you need to get a transmission flush sooner, in order to help protect your car's transmission. There are some common signs that you need to perform a transmission flush on your car or truck.

Transmission Grinding or Strange Noises A vehicle transmission that is contaminated with dirt, grease and sludge can display symptoms very similar to inadequate levels of transmission fluid. When driving your vehicle, if you notice your transmission grinding or making strange sounds, you should stop the vehicle and check the transmission fluid level while the engine is still running. Insure that the transmission fluid color is bright red and not brown or black because of grime or sludge.

If the fluid level of the transmission is acceptable, your vehicle probably needs a transmission flush. Problems Shifting Gears Regardless if you drive an automatic or manual, your car requires clean transmission fluid that flows easily throughout your car's transmission. A transmission that contains too much dirt or sludge will cause sluggish response in the transmission which will result in your vehicle changing gears too quickly or too late while driving. In manual transmission vehicles, you may find it very hard to change gears at all.

Slipping Gears A dirty transmission may cause a lack of hydraulic power, much the same as not having enough transmission fluid will cause. In order to stay in the appropriate gear, the transmission must develop enough pressure.

When a transmission is too dirty, contaminants may interfere with the flow of transmission fluid that helps with this.

Trust Us With Your Transmission Problems

If you're transmission has no other problems, and the fluid level of the transmission is full or close to itthe problem is probably restricted fluid flow due to a buildup of dirt and contaminants that need to be flushed out. Surging of the Vehicle When your vehicle's transmission is polluted with a lot of dirt and contaminants, and needs a transmission flush, you may notice unexplainable surging of your vehicle. Because your car's dirty transmission does not allow for adequate transmission fluid flow, your vehicle may tend to jump or surge forward and fall backwards for no good reason.

This is caused by inconsistent flow of clean transmission fluid that is needed to ensure smooth operation of the gears and other moving parts inside the transmission bell housing. Delay in Vehicle Movement Another sign that your vehicle may have contaminated transmission fluid is when the vehicle stalls for one or two seconds before moving after having been put in gear.

If there are no other problems with the transmission, a transmission flush may help. You should be aware that if the vehicle is displaying these symptoms, your dirty transmission may have already caused bigger problems. CarsDirect Staff. Saved Vehicles 0 Saved Searches 0.

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transmission surging

CarsDirect Staff The CarsDirect editorial team is dedicated to providing our readers with the latest on new and used cars, expert opinions on which vehicles make the grade, and all the fun stuff in between.

Interested in Leasing? Select a Make. Select a Model. Find Used Cars Browse a huge selection of local inventory. Recent Articles. Research Cars Select a Make.Transmission fluid is no less than the lifeblood of the transmission system. It keeps all the components in the system, allowing them to run smoothly. Its absence can cause the parts to wear and tear beyond repair. The damage will be even worse in an automatic car because the automatic transmission fluid ATF doubles as an antifreeze to prevent the engine overheating.

So, low transmission fluid symptoms are something that you should stay alert of. Its main function is to lubricate the transmission system. The lubrication helps with transferring the engine power to the ground. The torque converter also uses the fluid to transfer rotation force from the engine to the transmission.

The fluid also absorbs the heat created inside the system and dispenses it through the radiator. Driving on low transmission fluid is extremely dangerous because it could lead to the transmission failure and other costly repairs.

You should know what happens if your transmission fluid is low and take actions immediately when the symptoms occur. Transmission fluid does not need to be changed during the entire lifespan of a vehicle. However, depending on the car you are driving, you may require to flush it a few times or change after every 50, miles. The low level of fluid could be the result of it leaking through a cracked or worn out component.

In that case, you have to fix the damaged part and refill the fluid.

transmission surging

How to tell if transmission fluid is low? Watch out for these low transmission fluid symptoms :. Dirt or gunk in the fluid is the primary reason for having a sluggish response from the transmission. No matter whether you drive a manual or automatic, the oil in the gearbox has to be clean, free of any dirt residue so that it can flow inside the parts without any snag.

Dirty oil will draw a too slow response from the gear shifting. Low manual transmission fluid symptoms will make the changing of gears extremely difficult. Erratic shifts cause the shifting of gear to happen too late or too soon.

It is one of the signs of low transmission fluid automatic cars. You could be sure of the problem if there is an accompanying banging sound.

Diagnose Automatic Transmission Problems

The hydraulic pressure has to be precise and work smoothly for changing the gears in an automatic transmission. The condition causes a vehicle to lurch forward before falling backward during regular driving operation. The inadequate force from the fluid is the only reason for such surging movements. Low level of fluid means low pressure in the transmission, which cause the delay in the gear change.

The response time is around 2 to 3 seconds, which is enough to tell you that there is something wrong with the transmission fluid. Low transmission fluid symptoms also include the slipping of the engaged gear.

It does not let the gear to say in the mode you have selected. If the fluid level is right, the culprit must be the residue buildup that impedes the fluid to flow freely.

One most important function of the fluid is to keep the transmission temperature to the normal level. When there is not enough fluid to lubricate the components, there will be a huge amount of friction, leading to the production of excessive heat. In fact, you will experience an overheated transmission in case of delayed shifts, gear slippage, power loss, burning smells, or other related problems.

When you face any symptoms of low transmission fluidpull off the car immediately to allow the components to blow off the steam. When the temperature is back to normal, try to drive to a servicing shop.Most stores are open nights and weekends. The transmission in your vehicle has hundreds of interconnected parts that are always moving, rubbing, heating up and interacting with other internal and external components.

Because there are so many parts in the transmission - and because each of those parts is continually exposed to friction and heat - it is natural that your transmission components will experience more wear and tear than other, simpler, mechanisms in your vehicle makeup. If your car is having transmission problems, it is important to catch it early before it becomes a more involved - and a more costly issue.

If you are experiencing any of the following transmission symptoms, we recommend bringing your vehicle in for a transmission service and inspection as soon as possible:. Manual transmission vehicles need transmission fluid to keep gears lubricated and to prevent grinding.

Fixing jerky automatic transmission and hesitation in acceleration 2006 Mazda 6

Automatic transmission vehicles need transmission fluid to create the hydraulic pressure that actually powers movement within the transmission. Without the right amount of clean and debris-free transmission fluid, transmissions can overheat and essential gears can slip, surge, or become ground down, and - especially in the case of automatic transmissions - total vehicle failure can occur.

In manual transmission systems, gear synchronizers - or synchros as they're commonly called - are the transmission component that makes the gear you are about to shift into spin at the same speed as the gear you are shifting from. By having the two gears spinning at the same speed during the shift, gear synchronizers create a smooth, seamless shifting experience.

Worn gear synchros are a common manual transmission problem, and if untreated, can cause transmission failure. A worn clutch is another common manual transmission problem. The clutch in a manual transmission system can become worn due to mechanical error if there is a hydraulic fluid leak in the clutch master cylinder, or by human error if the driver is frequently accelerating and shifting through the gears without releasing his or her foot from the clutch.

Transmission Surging

This can burn up a manual transmission clutch quickly and will result in a clutch replacement service. Needle bearings are small, lightweight roller bearings that help prevent gears in the automatic transmission's torque converter from grinding.

If the transmission's needle bearings become worn or sluggish you may hear grinding or brushing noises coming from your vehicle while the car is in motion. This sound can mean your transmission gears are moving inefficiently and being prematurely worn down.

Because there are so many intricate parts in the transmission system, you don't want to wait until there is a critical problem to have your transmission fluids changed, and your other transmission systems inspected. If you suspect you might be having a transmission problem, or if you just have a transmission maintenance question, a Firestone Complete Auto Care automotive service professional will be happy to answer any of your questions.

Get a transmission flush service to prevent costly transmission repairs. If your transmission is slipping or not shifting properly, the experts at Firestone Complete Auto Care can help. Schedule an appointment online today! Learn about the types of vehicle transmissions. See how an automatic transmission is different from a manual transmission at Firestone Complete Auto Care. Shop Tires Get Services. All fields are required Year. ZIP code is needed for local pricing.

Get Tire Pricing. Cross Section. Aspect Ratio. Rim Diameter.Transmission fluid is vital to the health and functionality of a vehicle's transmission. Low transmission fluid levels can seriously impede normal transmission function and lead to major, costly repairs over time if not addressed promptly. What follows is a brief list of the most common signs of a low transmission fluid level. A transmission that is low on transmission fluid will lack the hydraulic power to adequately shift and maintain transmission gear position.

Transmission fluid provides the fluid force necessary to keep a transmission functioning properly in all gear selections. Many times a transmission that is low on transmission fluid will fail to function at all. No matter what transmission gear is selected, the transmission will fail to engage and will instead act as if it were stuck in neutral. This is the result of a lack of transmission fluid force. For a transmission to shift quickly and precisely, adequate transmission fluid must be available to provide the force needed to shift the gears.

A surging transmission, a transmission that causes a vehicle to lurch forward and then fall backward during normal operation, is often the result of a low transmission fluid level.

The surging and erratic transmission movements are caused by insufficient fluid force during all ranges of transmission operation.

transmission surging

Just like a vehicle engine that needs adequate engine oil levels to help maintain normal operating temperature, a transmission requires adequate transmission fluid levels to help maintain normal transmission operating temperature. A low transmission fluid level increases friction and heat, both of which raise transmission operating temperature.

Sluggish Transmission Shifts For a transmission to shift quickly and precisely, adequate transmission fluid must be available to provide the force needed to shift the gears.

Transmission Surging A surging transmission, a transmission that causes a vehicle to lurch forward and then fall backward during normal operation, is often the result of a low transmission fluid level. Increased Transmission Operating Temperature Just like a vehicle engine that needs adequate engine oil levels to help maintain normal operating temperature, a transmission requires adequate transmission fluid levels to help maintain normal transmission operating temperature.Engines are so complicated that if they hadn't been in production for over a century, it's likely that no one would believe they'd really work.

Almost all surging conditions encountered by fuel-injected engines have to do with "parameter hunting. A badly clogged fuel filter will reduce fuel pressure enough that the ECM must open the fuel injectors more to maintain the same amount of flow.

Once the ECM has effectively "pegged" the fuel filters into the open position, fuel pressure rapidly rises, which shoots more fuel into the engine than it needs. The ECM compensates by shutting the injectors, resulting in another fuel pressure drop and renewal of the surging cycle. Fuel injectors contain very fine mesh filters, which can just as easily clog and cause the same sort of surging. After spending some time in storage, gasoline will begin to react with the oxygen around it and lose its potency.

This oxidization process is essentially combustion in very slow motion: fuel combines with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide, water and contaminants like nitric oxides and loose carbon molecules. Once the engine begins ingesting this "pre-burnt" gasoline, its ECM reads the exhaust temperature as a "lean burn" too much air condition.

In attempting to adjust, the computer injects more bad fuel, which essentially douses the flame in the engine's combustion chambers. Vacuum leaks can cause surging on some engines, but it depends on the type of fuel injection system.

The MAF mass air flow systems used on many cars measure the amount of air flowing through the engine's throttle valve throttle body and use that information to determine how much fuel to inject. Vacuum leaks in MAF systems will usually cause a rough idle, but often will not result in surging under cruise.

Other cars use MAP manifold air pressure systems that extrapolate air flow from the intake manifold's internal air pressure. MAP systems are more prone to surge while cruising than MAF systems, although both will surge during acceleration if a vacuum leak is present. This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information.

To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us. What Causes Surging in Car Engines? Bad Gasoline After spending some time in storage, gasoline will begin to react with the oxygen around it and lose its potency. Vacuum Leaks Vacuum leaks can cause surging on some engines, but it depends on the type of fuel injection system.

About the Author This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. Photo Credits exhaust fulmes image by bilderbox from Fotolia.Automotive Forums.

My 99 Blazer will occassionally surge when it shifts gears, I really dont think its surging more like the computer? Its an automatic with only miles on it. The fluid is just fine and there doesnt seem to be any other issues besides it. It does this when its warm or cold. Could this be a the solenoid?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I bought it used with approx miles on it. Should i have them completely flush it also? Would that be the cause though if only does it once in a great while. It appears to be only happening from the shift from 1st to 2nd start from light and then when it shifts the first time.

I always drive it in Overdrive also. It could be the pressure control solenoid or any of good number of other things. If you don't have any way to test the function of the solenoid, you could gamble the price of a new one that it is bad to see if that fixes your problem they're fairly easy to remove and replacebut since the process normally involved changing your fluid some of it anyway and filter, I'd do that first and see if that helps.

As far as the whole professional flush thing, I'm not sure it's worth the money. You can get about half or more of your fluid out by driving the truck up on ramps and just removing the pan. In my opinion, that's probably enough fresh fluid to halt any of the poor performance issues that old fluid might cause.

The real benefit comes from changing out a potentially clogged filter, which some flush guys may not even do for you. Just be sure you install a new metal-clad seal into the hole that the filter fits up into and clean off your pan magnet real good. Best of luck! The SES light has never came on. I have a computer scanner that can tell me any past codes and it came up clean. As for the transmission solenoid I will look that up as I have no idea how to change it nor where it even is Transmission surging problems?There are a few words in the language of auto repair that make car owners want to crawl back into bed, and "transmission" is at the top of the list.

Unfortunately, most repair shops know this, and will take advantage of the situation by reaching deep into your pocket. Before you hand over your keys and a blank check, brush up on the simple end of automatic transmissions. If something is seriously wrong, at least you'll be armed with enough knowledge to avoid being overcharged, over-repaired or straight ripped off.

Your transmission is a remarkable contraption. Somehow, it can shift your car from gear to gear, knowing how fast you need to go and how quickly you need to get there. What goes on inside is a mystery to most. Unless your thirst for automotive knowledge borders on compulsive, you can leave it a mystery. The basics will be enough to have an intelligent which translates to "not about to be ripped off" conversation with your mechanic.

While there are many, many little parts inside, your transmission is essentially made up of a few key systems. Now that you know a little about what's happening in there, you can try to figure out why your transmission is acting up, or at least understand what your mechanic is talking about while he tries to make your bill into his new fishing boat.

These two groups of problems are caused by the same faults in your transmission, so whichever your car is doing, the following applies. It's important to check your transmission fluid at least twice a year. Not only can a low fluid level cause your car to shift poorly, it can eventually lead to transmission damage, and a costly repair.

If your car seems to be losing fluid on a regular basis, you may have a leak. Checking for leaks isn't as trying as it may seem. Unless it's been changed to a non-dyed fluid, your car will have red transmission fluid.

Here are a few places to check for leaks:. Your transmission's filter is vital to its performance. If you haven't replaced your filter in a while or ever for a lot of usbe sure to do this before you start talking about rebuilds or replacements. Most transmission problems can't be fixed by the average do-it-yourselfer. There are just too many specialized tools and pieces of equipment you'll need, and buying this expensive gear just to screw up your first three tries at fixing the thing just doesn't make too much sense.

Now that you're in front of the firing squad, it's time to drop some knowledge on your fix-it guy. Tell him what the car's doing. Then tell him what you found out when you inspected the transmission. If there's a leak, let him know where and how much is leaking. When your transmission gets tired enough, you'll have to have it rebuilt. It's true. For some makes and models of car, it's true a little too often, but that's neither here nor there.

The important thing is checking any other possible causes to your problem before you take the transmission apart, which is very expensive. If you haven't replaced your filter yet, do it! This fixes a nice percentage of transmission problems. If your filter is good, and nothing simple is out of adjustment, be prepared to drop some serious dough on the rebuild. The good news is that most shops warrantee a transmission rebuild for a nice amount of time.

A small consolation as your handing over the credit card, but at least you know that it will get fixed and stay fixed. You may not be able to save big money by doing your own transmission rebuild, but keeping up with your regular maintenance will keep you out of the shop as much as possible.


Transmission surging